LEARNING MANAGMENT THEORY: HOW EXPERTS FOSTER LEARNING IN HIGHER EDUCATION AND PROFFESSIONAL PRACTICE ENVIRONMENTS

Authors

  • IRIS STAMMBERGER Learning Management Institute Winchester

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.24234/miopap.v2i2.266

Keywords:

Faculty development, learning environments, professional learning, cognitive engineering, applied cognitive science, human computer interaction

Abstract

The article highlights the essence of learning management theory and its successful implementation in higher education institutions. The long-term positive influence of the theory in the framework of professional practice is also proved. The author offers a number of theoretical and practical solutions to encourage the educational process and create a fertile ground for the professional growth of students.

Author Biography

IRIS STAMMBERGER, Learning Management Institute Winchester

Proffesor of Learning Management Institute Winchester, USA

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Published

2013-09-11

How to Cite

STAMMBERGER, I. (2013). LEARNING MANAGMENT THEORY: HOW EXPERTS FOSTER LEARNING IN HIGHER EDUCATION AND PROFFESSIONAL PRACTICE ENVIRONMENTS. Main Issues Of Pedagogy And Psychology, 2(2), 28-40. https://doi.org/10.24234/miopap.v2i2.266

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